Last edited by Mubar
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

7 edition of Shanghai Refuge found in the catalog.

Shanghai Refuge

A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto

by Ernest G. Heppner

  • 98 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by University of Nebraska Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Biography: general,
  • Civil rights & citizenship,
  • Immigration & emigration,
  • Biography / Autobiography,
  • Biography/Autobiography,
  • China,
  • Historical - Holocaust,
  • History / Europe / General

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages217
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7905902M
    ISBN 100803272812
    ISBN 109780803272811

    Shanghai. However, Iwry‟s book is autobiographical and the Mir yeshiva only dots the landscape of his memoir. The three aforementioned works represent one of the main issues in the field of study: research on the Mir yeshiva only emerges in small portions in works of varying subjects on the Jews of Size: KB. Wartime Shanghai and the Jewish refugees from Central Europe survival, co-existence, and identity in a multi-ethnic city / by: Eber, Irene, Published: () Shanghai sanctuary: Chinese and Japanese policy toward European Jewish refugees during World War II / by: Gao, Bei.

      The unlikely refuge of Shanghai, the only city in the world that did not require a visa, was buffeted by the struggle between European imperialism, Japanese aggression, and Chinese nationalism. Ernest G. Heppner's compelling testimony is a brilliant account of this little-known haven/5(43).   As World War II began, approximat Jews lived in Shanghai. Ab had arrived seeking refuge as the Nazis gained strength. Another .

    This book examines two large and generally overlooked diaspora communities, one Jewish and the other Slavic, which found refuge in Shanghai during the period Victims of discrimination and persecution in their own lands—Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Ukraine—they chose Shanghai as their destination because no documentation was required to enter the city and settle there. Ernest G. Heppner is the author of Shanghai Refuge ( avg rating, 43 ratings, 4 reviews, published )/5.


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Shanghai Refuge by Ernest G. Heppner Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Shanghai Refuge" by Ernest Heppner is the story of two Jewish refugees who manage to escape Nazi Germany for Shanghai--as one of the only places left open to refugees at the time. It is their story of loss, mistreatment, inhumanity, and occasional bits of happiness during the long years of World War by:   The unlikely Shanghai Refuge book of Shanghai, the only city in the world that did not require a visa, was buffeted by the struggle between European imperialism, Japanese aggression, and Chinese nationalism.

Ernest G. Heppner's compelling testimony is a brilliant account of this little-known haven/5. The unlikely refuge of Shanghai, the only city in the world that did not require a visa, was buffeted by the struggle between European Shanghai Refuge book, Japanese aggression, and Chinese nationalism.

Ernest G. Heppner's compelling testimony is a brilliant account of this little-known haven. ø Although Heppner was a member of a privileged middle-class Jewish family, he suffered from the constant. Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto - Kindle edition by Heppner, Ernest G.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II /5(10).

Read this book on Questia. The unlikely refuge of Shanghai, the only city in the world that did not require a visa, was buffeted by the struggle between European imperialism, Japanese aggression, and. The Shanghai Ghetto, formally known as the Restricted Sector for Stateless Refugees, was an area of approximately one square mile in the Hongkew district of Japanese-occupied Shanghai (the southern Hongkou and southwestern Yangpu districts of modern Shanghai).

The area included the community around the Ohel Moshe Synagogue but ab of the city's Jewish refugees were restricted or Kanji: 無国籍難民限定地区. Getty Images. Former Jewish refugees pose for photos in Tilanqiao area on Ap in Shanghai, China.

About former Jewish refugees and Author: Tiberiu Weisz. The Paperback of the Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto by Ernest G.

Heppner at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or Brand: UNP - Nebraska Paperback. Get this from a library. Shanghai refuge: a memoir of the World War II Jewish ghetto. [Ernest G Heppner] -- The life story of a Holocaust survivor, born in Breslau inwho emigrated to Shanghai in March and to the USA in Relates his experiences in Germany during the first years of Nazi rule.

The irony is that as a result of this, Shanghai was to become a refuge during the s and 30s for more than three million Chinese fleeing civil war, warlordism, disease, drought and famine. COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

: Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto () by Heppner, Ernest G. and a great selection of similar New, Used and /5(43). As Shanghai succumbs to a seemingly apocalyptic deluge, a man takes refuge in his bathtub, only to find himself, moments later, floating through the city's streets The characters in this literary exploration of one of the world’s biggest cities are all on a mission.

Stephen C. Feinstein Department of History University of Wisconsin-River Falls Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto, by Ernest G. Heppner. ~ncoln: University of Nebraska Press, pp. $ This inspiring memoir is a story of survival.

Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto: Heppner, Ernest G.: Books - (7). Shanghai Refuge | Jews who fled to Shanghai were confined by Japanese forces to an area one mile square. Heppner describes the daily struggle to survive: overcrowding and disease, the underground world of criminals, hunger, heat, and humidity.

Shanghai book store is huge with a large collection of Chinese books for all levels. The place is very big and has 7 floors filled with different type of books properly categorized. It was not crowded when we were there on Wednesday and hence, the place is quiet.4/5(33).

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto by Ernest G. Heppner and Ernest Heppner (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. Lavishly illustrated and meticulously researched, Remembering Shanghai follows five generations from a hardscrabble village to vibrant Shanghai to the bright lights of Hong Kong. By turns harrowing and heartwarming, this vivid memoir explores identity, loss and the unpredictable nature of life against the epic backdrop of China in turmoil.

Ernest G. Heppner, Shanghai Refuge: A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln,P. Shanghai was ”a metropolis of more than five million people in (and) included every conceivable nationality.

The unlikely refuge of Shanghai, the only city in the world that did not require a visa, was buffeted by the struggle between European imperialism, Japanese aggression, and Chinese nationalism. Ernest G. Heppner's compelling testimony is a brilliant account of this little-known haven. Although Heppner was a member of a privileged middle-class.Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Shanghai Refuge Memoir of World War II Jewish Ghetto SIGNED Ernest Heppner WWII at the best online prices at eBay!

Free shipping for many products! A book with obvious wear. May have some damage to the cover but integrity still intact. The binding may be slightly damaged but Seller Rating: % positive.At first, Shanghai seemed an unlikely refuge, but as it became clear that most countries in the world were limiting or denying entry to Jews, it became the only available choice.

Until Augustno visas were required for entering Shanghai. Ernest Heppner, who fled .